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Newsletter November 2017 

Dear friends, 

For those in London this Friday, can I put in a good word for a symposium: "Modern Classicisms: Classical Art and Contemporary Artists in Dialogue" at at Kings College – I'm on a panel with Christopher Le Brun (chair) and Ruth Allen, Minna Moore Ede and Elizabeth Prettejohn.  More info below. 

And two magazine features which just came out this Fall - Cultured Magazine and Whitewall.  The Whitewall piece is an interview with composer Nico Muhly - his Opera "Marnie" premieres at the ENO November 18th. 

Very best wishes, 

Nick 

MODERN CLASSICISMS SYMPOSIUM

MODERN CLASSICISMS: CLASSICAL ART AND CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS IN DIALOGUE


Great Hall King's Building Strand Campus
10/11/2017 (09:00-18:30)

 

What is it about Greek and Roman art that still captivates the modern imagination? How can contemporary art help us to see the classical legacy with new eyes? And what can such modern-day responses – situated against the backdrop of others over the last two millennia – reveal about our own cultural preoccupations in the twenty-first century?

The art of ancient Greece and Rome is not just a thing of the past, it also exists in the present day – whether as ideal, antitype or point of departure. During the 2017–2018 academic year, King’s College London is hosting a range of events exploring contemporary responses to classical visual traditions: these will include an exhibition at Bush House in in March/April 2018, organised in collaboration with the Musée d’Art Classique de Mougins, and designed to coincide with our co-hosting of the AAH Annual Conference.

Our opening Modern Classicisms workshop on 10th November sets out to explore the contemporary relevance of classical visual traditions: by bringing together art historians, collectors, critics and artists, we aim to examine what the classical artistic legacy means from the vantage-point of contemporary artistic practice. Confirmed artists, speakers and respondents include:  Dalya Alberge, Ruth Allen, Tiphaine Besnard, Bruce Boucher, James Cahill, Léo Caillard, Michael Craig-Martin, Matthew Darbyshire, Charlotte Higgins, Brooke Holmes, Nick Hornby, Jessica Hughes, Patrick Kelley, Polina Kosmadaki, Christopher Le Brun, Lisa Le Feuvre, Christian Levett, Isabel Lewis, Simon Martin, Robin Osborne, Christodoulos Panayiotou, Elizabeth Prettejohn, Marc Quinn, Mary Reid Kelley, Alexandre Singh, Michael Squire, Caroline Vout and Sarah Wilson.

PRESS CLIPPINGS

CULTURED MAGAZINE FALL 2017

WHITEWALL MAGAZINE FALL 2017

Sculptor Nick Hornby in Conversation with Composer Nico Muhly
 
Nick Hornby and Nico Muhly met in 1999, in the Garden of Cosmic Speculation at Portrack House in Scotland. The garden was conceived by Maggie Keswick and Charles Jencks (who are also rumored to have coined the term “postmodern”). Almost twenty years on, Hornby and Muhly have a conversation about performativity and the landscape. Hornby currently has an exhibition of sculpture in the gardens of Glyndebourne Opera House in Lewes, and Muhly’s Marnie operan, based on the famous Hitchcock film of the same name, gets its world premiere at the English National Opera in London in November. 
 
NICO MUHLY: Unlike many world-famous opera houses, Glyndebourne is equally well known for its position in the natural world that surrounds it. There is also a codified sense of ritual around attending a show there.
 
NICK HORNBY: Nico, I agree. But first I’m distracted by the word “natural.” Glyndebourne isn’t “natural”—picnicking in black-tie isn’t an everyday affair (I normally picnic in jeans and spill ketchup down my shirt). Glyndebourne is leisure that’s hard work. But this is no bad thing. I’m a sculptor and I love hard work . . . these objects take months and months of design, and cutting and sanding.


[Read More]

ONGOING


Hornby Tantra at Pinsent Mason LLP 
30 Crown Pl, London EC2A 4ES

Until 2nd December
Pictures here


Sculpture (1504-2017)
Glyndebourne New Road, Lewes BN8 5UU

Until March, 2018
Please email alex.warner@glyndebourne.com to arrange an appointment.  
 




Newsletter August 2017 

 

Dear friends,

Tomorrow is the last day of  “The Curators’ Eggs” at Paul Kasmin gallery, NY.   Below are some images from the show. 

Next week Glyndebourne Opera Festival is coming to an end, but my work remains installed until March 2018 and you can email alex.warner@glyndebourne.com to arrange an appointment.  

The shows received coverage in: The Art Newspaper, The FT, The Times, Spectator Life, Vogue, Tatler, Town & Country, Artdaily.orgArtsy, ArtLyst, Blackbook, and Features in  FAD, Blouin ArtinfoFword MagazineDocument Journal, NYNE Magazine, Pylot Magazine

Finally, Last weekend I took part in a panel discussion about Queer British Art with Tate's curator - Clare Barlow and Tim Redfern at Wilderness Festival.  Pictures here.

And, in London, I’ve recently installed one of the collaborative Hornby Tantra pieces at Pinsent Mason LLP along side a Michael Craig Martin site specific commission. Pictures here

Very best wishes, 

Nick 

 

CURRENT

The Curators' Eggs
Paul Kasmin Gallery, 293 Tenth Avenue 
July 12 – August 18, 2017 

Sculpture (1504-2017)
Glyndebourne 

Until March, 2018


Contemporary Sculpture Fulmer 
Fulmer Common Rd, Slough SL3. Open by appointment 

Mask (Picasso i), 2017, Contemporary Sculpture Fulmer, UK


Pinsent Mason LLP
30 Crown Pl, London EC2A 4ES

The Horizon Comes in Chinese Blue, Hague Blue, Archive, Railings, Cornforth, Bubblicious and Firefly Red, 2013

PRESS CLIPPINGS

Looking Sharp, The Times, May 2017
Hornby’s art historical smorgasbord at Glyndebourne, Gareth Harris, The Art Newspaper, July 2017
Stronger sales and supersize cigarettes, Melanie Gerlis, The Financial Times
12 Artists in Summer Group Shows Who Deserve Solo Shows, Artsy, Aug 2017. 
 

[...] Hornby’s untitled sculpture, a highlight of this 13-artist show, might remind you of a fragment of an ornately carved walnut table, albeit one that’s scaled for a giant. [...] This visual puzzle is a multi-layered art-historical reference. The woman is a three-dimensional rendering of Henri Matisse’s cut-out Acrobat (1952). When Hornby doubled the rendering [...] he found that the result looked, from the front, surprisingly similar to the mask in Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon (1907).

– Alex Forbes

Nick Hornby: Grand Narratives and Little Anecdotes, Document Journal, July 2017
Nick Hornby, Sculpture in 2017, Kat Kuch, FWORD Magazine, June 2017
A Very English Affair: Vogue’s Hamish Bowles Attends a Summer Opera Festival in Glyndebourne, Hamish Bowles, Vogue, June 2017
 

[...] His dynamic pieces morph iconic sculptures by such masters as Michelangelo, Rodin, and Brancusi (in a technique that could only be possible with the benefit of contemporary technology) so that as you walk around them, familiar silhouettes fall into view only to melt into others as you complete the circle. Seeming to sprout from the bulrushes fringing a pond, standing proud among the sheep and lambs, or set on plinths in a wood-paneled gallery like traditional portrait busts, the works were a happy complement to the operatic experience that Vick had conceived—the energy of the present reverberating in the storied wonder of this exceptional place.

– Hamish Bowles

Simplicity in Complex, Claire Meadows, After NYNE Magazine, August 2017
Mark Sherin interviews artist Nick Hornby, Mark Sherin, FAD, Aug 2017
Copyright © 2017 Nick Hornby, All rights reserved.
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